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Henry Russel Award

In 1925, supported by funds from a bequest from Henry Russel (Law, 1875), the Regents established the Henry Russel Award. Considered the University’s highest honor for faculty at the early to mid-career stages of their career, the Henry Russel Award is conferred annually to faculty members who have demonstrated an extraordinary record of accomplishment in scholarly research and/or creativity, as well as an excellent record of contributions as a teacher.

Open/Edit a Nomination

General Information

Eligibility

Nominees must be tenure-track instructional faculty at the University of Michigan for no more than six years at the time of nomination, with the rank of assistant professor or associate professor. Nominations of outstanding women, minorities and members of other groups historically underrepresented in their disciplines are encouraged.

Selection Criteria

This award recognizes faculty early in their academic careers who already have demonstrated an extraordinary record of accomplishment in scholarship, research, and creativity and have also demonstrated excellence as a teacher.

Number of Awards

Up to two awards will be made, each with an honorarium of $5,000.

Source of Nominations

Nominations may be submitted by deans, directors, department/program heads, promotion or award committees, or individual faculty members. To re-nominate someone previously nominated, contact Honors and Awards to activate the online dossier.

Selection Process

A committee of distinguished senior faculty from different disciplines and academic units, chaired by the Dean of the Graduate School, reviews nominations and makes recommendations to the President of the University. Awards are publicly announced early in the fall term and formally presented on the occasion of the Henry Russel Lecture in the 2018 winter term.

Deadline

The nomination deadline is 5:00 pm, Friday, March 24, 2017.

For more information contact:

Honors and Awards
Telephone: (734) 764-4400
E-mail: honorsandawards@umich.edu

Guidelines for Preparing Nominations

As described below, a nomination dossier must include a cover sheet with contact information, a nominating letter, and curriculum vitae. Incomplete nomination dossiers cannot be reviewed. The Graduate School will add to each nomination dossier a dissertation committee service report and the Registrar’s Teaching Evaluation “Instructor Report” that tabulates quantitative data only.

The online nomination dossier may be set up by a U-M faculty or staff member. Others may be given login access to the site as needed. The nomination system may be accessed as often as needed in order to complete the nomination dossier. All materials must be uploaded in Adobe PDF format.

Cover Sheet

Complete the online cover sheet with all information requested for both the nominee and the nominator—not the administrator who may have initiated the dossier.

Letter of Nomination

As committee members represent a range of disciplines and may not be familiar with the nominee’s field, describe the nominee’s contributions in a way that conveys their significance to those not acquainted with the field. Given the number of highly accomplished mid-career faculty, the letter should explain the particular distinction that makes the nominee exceptionally qualified for this honor. The letter may incorporate quotations from former and current students, peers and faculty, including from letters solicited for tenure review, that describe the significance of the nominee’s scholarly and research achievements, teaching and mentoring excellence, service contributions and other impact measures outside the classroom.

The letter may be no longer than 2,000 words. A new letter may be submitted for re-nominations or an addendum may be submitted to update the dossier.

Letters should cover the areas below; those that do not will disadvantage the nominee:

  • A concise description of the nominee’s major research, scholarly and/or creative endeavors and accomplishments, including an explanation of the overall significance of the work and evidence for its impact on the nominee’s field or discipline
  • Evidence of the nominee’s professional achievements and reputation, particularly through recognition by her or his peers, and an explanation of the significance of major external awards
  • An evaluation of the nominee’s contributions, ability, and influence as member of the teaching faculty which might include, for instance, leadership in design of new degrees, programs or curriculum; the quality and impact of the nominee’s teaching and courses; and significant awards recognizing notable accomplishments as an educator
  • Evidence that the nominee serves as an influential and successful advisor to graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and junior faculty, as appropriate to the field and career stage;
  • Evidence that shows the nominee’s impact outside the classroom in significant service or professional contributions, including formal or informal administrative roles in the University or in the discipline or profession, service on editorial boards and in other professional organizations and societies, or outstanding service to communities and institutions beyond the University

Curriculum Vitae

Provide the nominee’s current c.v.

Open/Edit a Nomination

Recipients of the Henry Russel Award

2016

  • Julia Adler-Milstein, Information
  • Jeremy N. Bassis, Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences
  • Clare H. Croft, Dance
  • Christopher R. Friese, Nursing

2015

  • Henriette Elvang, Physics
  • Kristin Kuster, Music, Theatre & Dance
  • SangHyun Lee, Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Brian Zikmund-Fisher, Health Behavior Health Education

2014

  • Dragan Huterer, Physics
  • Scott R. Lyons, American Culture and English Language and Literature
  • Thomas F. Wenisch, Computer Science and Engineering

2013

  • Allison Steiner, Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences and Earth and Environmental Sciences
  • Angela Violi, Mechanical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Macromolecular Science

2012

  • Lada Adamic, School of Information, Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
  • Aaron Pierce, Physics
  • Haoxing Xu, Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology

2011

  • Anthony Grbic, Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
  • David Harding, Sociology
  • Anna Michalak, Civil & Environmental Engineering

2010

  • Cindy Lustig, Psychology
  • Patricia Wittkopp, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

2009

  • Luming Duan, Physics
  • Anna Grzymala-Busse, Political Science
  • Laura Kasischke, English Language & Literature

2008

  • Edwin Bergin, Astronomy
  • Jason Owen-Smith, Sociology, Organizational Studies

2007

  • Anne Curzan, English Language & Literature, Education
  • Jerome Lynch, Civil and Environmental Engineering

2006

  • Amy Porter, Wind and Percussion
  • Dennis Sylvester, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

2005

  • David T. Blaauw, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
  • Anna Stefanopoulou, Mechanical Engineering

2004

  • Todd Austin, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
  • Brian Conrad, Mathematics
  • Lorna Goodison, English Language & Literature

2003

  • William V. Giannobile, Periodontics/Prevention & Geriatrics
  • Scott J. Hollister, Biomedical Engineering, Surgery and Mechanical Engineering
  • Denise Kirschner, Microbiology & Immunology
  • John V. Moran, Human Genetics
  • Michael J. Solomon, Chemical Engineering

2002

  • Clark T. C. Nguyen, EECS
  • Yoichi Osawa, Pharmacology
  • Johanna H. Prins, English Language & Literature

2001

  • Lisa Curran, Biology/Natural Resources

2000

  • Jeffrey Fessler, EECS
  • Webb Keane, Anthropology

1999

  • Thomas Hales, Mathematics
  • Aalexander Ninfa, Biological Chemistry
  • Ann Marie Sastry, Mechanical Engineering & Applied Mechanics

1998

  • Susan Alcock, Classical Art & Archaeology/Classical Studies
  • Trevor Wooley, Mathematics

1997

  • Carla Sinopoli, Anthropology
  • Kamal Sarabandi, EECS

1996

  • Celeste A. Brusati, History of Art
  • Dante A. Amidei, Physics

1995

  • H. Brinkley Messick, Anthropology
  • Khalil Najafi, EECS

1994

  • Stephen Lee, Chemistry

1993

  • Jessy W. Grizzle, EECS
  • John C. Mitani, Anthropology

1992

  • James M. Wilson, Internal Medicine

1991

  • David Srolovitz, Materials Science

1990

  • Alice Fulton, English Language & Literature
  • Philip Hanlon, Mathematics

1989

  • Susan Gelman, Psychology

1988

  • Thomas P. Beresford, Psychiatry
  • Thomas E. Crow, History of Art

1987

  • Nancy Cantor, Psychology
  • Jennifer A. Kitchell, Geology
  • Barbara Boardman Smuts, Psychology

1986

  • Richard I. Arculus, Geological Sciences

1985

  • Noburu Kikuchi, Mechanical Engineering
  • Donald Kinder, Political Science

1984

  • Daniel C. Fisher, Geological Sciences

1983

  • Peter A. Railton, Philosophy

1982

  • Daniel M. Burns, Jr., Mathematics
  • John T. Lehman, Biology

1981

  • Gayl A. Jones, English Language & Literature

1980

  • Philip D. Gingerich, Geological Sciences
  • Robert P. Kirshner, Physics

1979

  • Joyce P. Marcus, Anthropology

1978

  • Charles F. Yocum, Biology

1977

  • William E. Bolcom, Music

1976

  • Rob Van der Voo, Geological Sciences

1975

  • Hugh L. Montgomery, Mathematics

1974

  • Bernard Q. Nietschmann, Geography

1973

  • John J. Voorhees, Dermatology

1972

  • Kent V. Flannery, Anthropology

1971

  • Lewis J. Kleinsmith, Biology

1970

  • Jeremiah G. Turcotte, Surgery

1969

  • William W. Freehling, History

1968

  • Arthur J. Vander, Physiology

1967

  • Theodore V. Buttrey, Classical Studies

1966

  • William P. Malm, Music

1965

  • Anthony J. Pennington, Electrical Engineering

1964

  • John M. DeNoyer, Geology

1963

  • George D. Zuidema, Surgery

1962

  • John R. G. Gosling, Obstetrics & Gynecology

1961

  • Lawrence B. Slobodkin, Zoology

1960

  • William L. Hays, Psychology

1959

  • William R. Dawson, Biology

1958

  • Oleg Grabar, History of Art

1957

  • Elman R. Service, Anthropology

1956

  • Donald R. Pearce, English Language & Literature

1955

  • Donald Arthur Glaser, Physics

1954

  • John W. Hall, History

1953

  • Edwin E. Moise, Mathematics

1952

  • Henry J. Gomberg, Electrical Engineering

1951

  • Ernst Pulgram, Romance Languages

1950

  • Chris J. D. Zarafonetis, Internal Medicine

1949

  • Richard C. Boys, English Language & Literature

1948

  • Robert M. Thrall, Mathematics

1947

  • Burton L. Baker, Anatomy

1946

  • Robert R. White, Chemical Engineering

1945

  • William B. Willcox, History

1944

  • Frederick K. Sparrow, Jr., Botany

1943

  • Carl A. Moyer, Surgery

1942

  • Richard H. Freyberg, Internal Medicine

1941

  • Herbert C. Youtie, Classical Studies

1940

  • Edgard M. Hoover, Jr., Economics
  • Frank H. Bethell, Internal Medicine

1939

  • Norman R. F. Maier, Psychology

1938

  • Franklin D. Johnston, Internal Medicine

1937

  • Frank E. Eggleton, Zoology

1936

  • Lawrence Preuss, Political Science

1935

  • Ralph Grafton Smith, Public Health

1934

  • Paul Mueschke, English Language & Literature

1933

  • Werner E. Bachmann, Chemistry

1932

  • William L. Ayres, Mathematics

1931

  • Earl L. Griggs, English Langauge & Literature

1930

  • Carl L. Hubbs, Zoology

1929

  • John Alexander, Surgery

1928

  • Laurence M. Gould, Geology

1927

  • Albert Hyma, History

1926

  • Carter L. Goodrich, Economics