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On Communicating Science

I gave a talk about my field of work a couple of months ago, to an audience of people mostly outside it. After the talk, a senior member in the audience came over and asked me a few questions about genetics and health. He had a family history of lung cancer, he said, and he had always assumed it was because everybody in his family smoked a great deal. However, there was a recent article that said that 60% of cancer is due to bad luck, so he was confused about whether smoking had played any role at all.


The views expressed in this post are the author’s and do not necessarily reflect those of Rackham Graduate School or the University of Michigan.

I Changed Research Groups and the World Didn't End - Part 2: Limbo

During my first week as a graduate student, I was inundated with resources from about a week of orientation sessions. Among the stacks of papers that I accumulated that week was a hardcopy of this mentoring guide published by Rackham. I remember thinking it looked potentially useful and briefly thumbing through it. But instead of being closely studied, the guide ended up in the middle of a stack of other papers which I had accrued at the same time, and my busy grad student life went on. As a burgeoning Ph.D. student, I had no concept of the real importance of good mentorship.

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