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Stories, blog posts, and more illuminating the experiences of graduate life and highlighting the impact of our students’ critical research.

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Thinking Harder About Student Mental Health

We have to do a better job dealing with mental health in the academy. We really, really have to. The most recent information suggests that almost half of Michigan students, at the graduate and undergraduate level, have felt overwhelming anxiety or severe sadness or loneliness. The number hovers around 80% who have felt overwhelmed or exhausted in the past year. The reality is that students dealing with some sort of mental or emotional struggles are not outliers—they are the majority of our student body. We need to face this reality if we’re going to make our campus a healthier place for our instructors and our students.

Move Yourself to U-Move

Most graduate students I know have that thing they do they when get stuck on a problem. Some get outside, some cook, some nap-- I grab the U-Move schedule and see what classes are happening. Fast-forward a few hours to the end of yoga class: I'm lying on my mat, my eyes are closed, the instructor is telling us to clear our mind, and all-of-the-sudden: Of course. The answer to my problem; it was obvious. Stuck no more!

A list of things from Fall 2015 that make graduate life better

During my last two years of undergrad, whenever I mentioned I was applying to graduate school, the most consistent response I got was a comment or joke about how I’d essentially be living in lab, even from friends who didn’t know much about graduate school in biology.

I like to think I’ve chosen science as my career but not my life and I don’t believe our time in graduate school should always be about academia. So while I was pretty sure I wasn’t going to be “living in lab,” I still made a mental note to actively pursue a healthy work-life balance in grad school like I did in undergrad. For me, that means: don’t give up your hobbies and that might mean occasionally prioritizing them before science (if possible).

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